Ballarat Ghost Town: Me Lonely? Hell, No!

Grab a jackass, a single blanket and a jug of Oh Be Joyful and come with us to meet some of the most colorful characters in one of Death Valley’s most notorious ghost towns. A pivotal scene from the 1969 movie “Easy Rider” was even filmed here. But it sure wasn’t the last.

Ballarat, Baby…

Did you know there’s a fascinating connection between Seligman, Arizona, the Panama Canal and President Lincoln’s widow, Mary Todd Lincoln? Despite Seligman Cemetery’s close proximity to busy Interstate 40 and nearby railroad tracks, the cemetery imbues a sense of peace and majesty of the not-forgotten past…

Jerome, Arizona. Just a small town with a killer view. Can you hear the sounds? Can you feel the energy? Walk down almost any road in town and let your imagination run loose. You might experience the past if you’re lucky.

Jerome will grow on you. Who knows, you might not ever want to leave. You wouldn’t be the first…

Sedona, Arizona is equal parts rugged, equal parts resort. You can get all your positive vortices, New Age vibes, crystal readings, sound wave massages and breathtaking adventures you want, but you’re not likely to find a place in Sedona more peaceful than on some of the most coveted real estate in town…

It’s hard to see at first. The old airport sitting out by itself, between Newberry Springs and Daggett. Like many places in our desert, it’s too tough to disappear, and has a story to tell. Explore its fascinating history and find out what’s happened since the county mandated evictions in 2012…

We were lucky enough to follow along some of Union Pacific steam locomotive Big Boy 4014’s historic journey as it passed through the Mojave Desert from Colton, California to Cheyenne, Wyoming for restoration. Much to the delight of railfans like us, Big Boy’s first scheduled stop was at scenic Mormon Rocks in the Cajon Pass.

Big Boy’s next stop was The Harvey House Railroad Depot in Barstow, originally known as the Casa del Desierto. It was Big Boy’s first visit in 50 years. Would the bittersweet reunion be its last?

The first peoples of the Mojave Desert used a rich language of symbolism that could be interpreted by others. Petroglyphs dot rocky landscape throughout the desert and are a remnant of the past. They can be hundreds to thousands of years old.

Things can get bizarre in the desert but it usually just adds to our fun. Man, do we have some tales to tell. Thanks for tagging along with us as we explore the mystery and majesty of the Mojave Desert, one exciting road trip at a time. There’s beauty in the subtle, stark and sublime.
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